Monthly Archives: June 2014

Learning Curves 9

The canoe hull is complete, fiberglass and epoxy inside and out; outwales, inwales, decks, and thwart.  All the essential pieces are in place, and I can still throw it over my shoulder and walk comfortably, with the double paddle tucked … Continue reading

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Learning Curves 8

  To escape the rain, I moved the canoe into the painting studio, and proceeded with fiberglass and epoxy.  The sealer coat was a bit tacky, positioning the fiberglass cloth was tedious, and it was late Tuesday afternoon before I … Continue reading

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Learning Curves 7

  Back outside with a sealer coat of epoxy, ready for fiberglass.  Which I ended up sanding down to bare wood again Sunday morning.  The few drops of rain that hit the uncured epoxy left white streaks and spots, and … Continue reading

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Learning Curves 6

We finally stitched the bottom into the hull this afternoon, and all those pieces of spruce have become a singularity.  We might have cleverly taken apart a tree and made it into a boat, pieces of several trees more likely, at … Continue reading

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Learning Curves 5

  “The beginning of all things lies still in the beyond in the form of ideas that have yet to become real.”  I Ching, hexagram 1, The Creative We live on the upper part of Scull Creek, which flows west … Continue reading

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Learning Curves 4

Today, I went ’round the bend. Actually, there are several problems with the material I chose. Spruce is much stiffer that either Atlantic cedar or western red cedar, and I cut the strips 1/4″ x 15/16″. There are more scarf … Continue reading

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Learning Curves 3

  Once lost, the information on primitive watercraft cannot, as a rule, be recovered.  “It might be said fairly that those who had the best opportunities to observe, including many whose profession it was to record the culture of primitive … Continue reading

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